knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Ally Tips

Graphic from Trinity’s Q Soc (of Ireland)

Following text from UC Davis’ Trans* Ally Tips Page

Trans Ally Tips

SOME WAYS TO BE A GOOD TRANS ALLY…

•    Don’t ever out a transperson. This is dangerous to their safety & can invalidate their identity.  Likewise, be aware of your surroundings when discussing trans issues with a transperson. For their safety & comfort, they may prefer not to discuss these topics in public places or among strangers.

•    Always use the pronouns & name the person wants you to use. If you’re unsure, ASK!  If you make a mistake, correct yourself, & politely (& subtly, if possible) correct others if they use the wrong pronoun.

•    Ask when & where it’s safe to use their chosen name & pronouns (e.g., if a transperson is not out at home, ask them how you should refer to them around their family, etc). Don’t ask transpeople what their “real” name is (i.e., the one they were born with).  If you know their birth name, do not divulge it to others.  

•    Instead of using prefixes like bio- or real- to designate that someone is not trans, use “non-trans” or the prefix “cis-”. Two reasons for this: one, using “real” or “bio” sets up a dichotomy in which transpeople are not considered “real” or “biological.”  Two, using the terms trans & non-trans or cis- alters the framework so that transpeople are the default rather than the Other.  Setting up trans as the norm can help make transphobia & gender privilege more obvious.

•    Instead of saying someone was born a boy (or a girl), try saying they were assigned male at birth (or were female-assigned).  These terms recognize the difference between sex & gender, and emphasize the ways in which sex & gender are assigned to individuals at birth, rather than being innate, binary or immutable qualities.

•    Don’t confuse gender with sexual preference.  Transpeople, like non-trans people, are straight, gay, bisexual, pansexual, asexual, etc.  Gender is not tied to sexual preference, & there are a million ways to express desire.

•    Don’t fetishize.  Transpeople’s bodies are not a public forum. “Creatures with cunts,” “the best of both worlds” & “chicks with dicks” are all inappropriate ways of describing transpeople’s bodies.

•    Don’t ask transpeople about their bodies, how they have sex, what their genitals are like, etc.  It’s rude & none of your business.  It can help to think about whether you would ask these questions of a non-trans person.

•    Don’t ask about surgery or hormone status; don’t ask “when are you going to have the surgery?” or “are you on hormones?” Like non-trans people, our medical histories & bodies can be intensely personal & private.  If transpeople want to share these details with you, allow them to do so on their own terms.

•    Don’t assume the only way to transition is through hormones/surgery, & understand that medical transition is very often based on economic status.  Recognize the classism inherent in associating medical transition with “authentic” trans identities.

•    Don’t assume all transpeople want hormones and/or surgery, or to transition at all.

•    Don’t assume all transpeople feel “trapped in the wrong body.” This is an oversimplification and not the way (all) transpeople feel.

•    Don’t assume all transpeople identify as “men” or “women.”  Many transpeople and genderqueer people identify as both, neither, or something altogether different.

•    Don’t tell transpeople what is appropriate to their gender (e.g., transwomen should grow their hair out & wear dresses).  Like non-trans people, we have varying forms of gender expression.

•    Recognize the diversity of trans & genderqueer lives. Remember that these identities are part of other identities, and intersect with race, class, sexual preference, age, etc.

•    Do listen if a transperson chooses to talk to you about their gender identity.  Be honest about things you don’t understand—don’t try to fake it!

•    Be aware of places transpeople may not be able to go (pun intended). Be understanding if a transperson doesn’t feel safe using a gendered bathroom or locker room. If your organization is holding an event, designate a gender-neutral bathroom in the building.

•    Recognize that not all transpeople or genderqueer folks are out there trying to smash the gender binary. Recognize that it’s not their responsibility. If you want to smash the gender binary, then you do it!

•    Don’t ask transpeople to educate you.  Do your own homework & research.  Understand that there is a difference between talking to individuals about their preferences/perspectives and forcing someone to be your educator.  Try not to view individuals as spokespeople; the trans communities are diverse, not one monolithic voice or viewpoint.

•    Don’t assume transmen are exempt from male privilege, misogyny, sexism, etc, just because of a so-called “girl past.”

•    Recognize that transwomen deal with sexism in a very real way (on top of transphobia).

•    Recognize that transwomen deserve access to “women-only” spaces/programs/shelters/etc.

•    Recognize your privilege & prejudices as a normatively gendered person.

•    Think about what makes you uncomfortable & why.

•    Don’t let transphobia slide.  Confront it as you would confront all other forms of oppression. Trans issues are rarely discussed & when they are it is often in a negative light. Transphobia is equally oppressive as (& works in conjunction with) sexism, homophobia, racism, classism, etc.

•    Talk about trans issues/rights.  Engage people in discussions & share your knowledge. The majority of “information” people have about trans issues is based on stereotypes & assumptions.  To most people, trans folks are the freaks from Jerry Springer.

•    Be aware of the vital role you play as a non-trans person. Remember that the way you talk about transpeople (e.g., using the right pronouns) influences how others perceive us & can make a difference in whether we pass, & whether we feel safe/comfortable. Always remember that people may be more likely to listen to & take cues from non-trans people than from transpeople.  What you say & do matters!

•    Don’t just mourn or take action when transpeople are murdered.  Celebrate trans lives & work at making trans & genderqueer issues more visible on a day-to-day basis.

•    Don’t tokenize.  Simply adding the “T” to LGB doesn’t make you or your organization hip, progressive, or an ally.  Make sure you have the resources, information & understanding to deserve that T.

•    Above all respect and support transpeople in their lives & choices.

(via sixxxundergrnd)

Source: knowhomo

lnkdroptheory:

I have been practicing regularly and the change in my life is obvious.
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lnkdroptheory:

I have been practicing regularly and the change in my life is obvious.
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lnkdroptheory:

I have been practicing regularly and the change in my life is obvious.
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lnkdroptheory:

I have been practicing regularly and the change in my life is obvious.
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lnkdroptheory:

I have been practicing regularly and the change in my life is obvious.
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lnkdroptheory:

I have been practicing regularly and the change in my life is obvious.

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Source: thrivedynamics

(Im)Perfect

  • (Friend) "...you are the sexiest woman I know"
  • (She) "Your compliment makes me feel confident even with all my imperfections"
  • (Friend) "I don't know what imperfections you're talking about but I would say if you do have imperfections that your imperfections are what make you perfect"
septetforadeadprincet:

penicillium-pusher:

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ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK
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penicillium-pusher:

Gender posters 1/2

ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK
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penicillium-pusher:

Gender posters 1/2

ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK
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septetforadeadprincet:

penicillium-pusher:

Gender posters 1/2

ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK
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septetforadeadprincet:

penicillium-pusher:

Gender posters 1/2

ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK
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septetforadeadprincet:

penicillium-pusher:

Gender posters 1/2

ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK
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septetforadeadprincet:

penicillium-pusher:

Gender posters 1/2

ACCURATE AND INCLUSIVE DEFINITIONS LOOK LOOK LOOK THIS IS VERY GOOD OK

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Source: penicillium-pusher

lazhuntiez:

Women Don’t Riot by Ana Castillo(For N.B.S)Women don’t riot, not in maquilas in Malaysia, Mexico, or Korea,not in sweatshops in New York or El Paso.They don’t revoltin kitchens, laundries, or nurseries.Not by the hundreds or thousands, changingsheets in hotels or in laundrieswhen scalded by hot water,not in restaurants where they clean and cleanand clean their hands raw.Women don’t riot, not sober and earnest,or high and strung out, not of any color, any race, not the rich, poor,or those in between. And mothers of all kinds especially don’t run rampant through the streets.In college those who’ve thought it out join hands in crucial times, carry signs,are dragged away in protest.We pass out petitions, organize a civilized vigil,return to work the next day.We women are sterilized, have more childrenthan they can feed,don’t speak the official language,want things they see on TV,would like to own a TV—women who were molested as childrenraped,beaten,harassed, which meansevery last one sooner or later;women who’ve defended themselvesand women who can’t or don’t know howwe don’t—won’t ever rise up in arms.We don’t storm through cities,take over the press, make a unified statement,once and for all: A third-millennium call—from this day on no more, not me, not my daughter,not her daughter either.Women don’t form a battalion, march arm in armacross continents boundby the same tongue, same food or lack thereof,same God, same abandonment,same broken heart,raising children on our own, haveso much endless misery in commonthat must stopnot for one woman or every woman,but for the sake of us all.Quietly, instead, one and each takes the offense, rejection, bureaucratic dismissal, diseasethat should not have been, insult,shove, blow to the head,a knife at her throat.She won’t fight, she won’t even scream—taught as she’s beento be brought down as if by surprise.She’ll die like an ant beneath a passing heel.Today it was her. Next time who.
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lazhuntiez:

Women Don’t Riot by Ana Castillo
(For N.B.S)

Women don’t riot, not in maquilas in Malaysia, Mexico, or Korea,
not in sweatshops in New York or El Paso.
They don’t revolt
in kitchens, laundries, or nurseries.
Not by the hundreds or thousands, changing
sheets in hotels or in laundries
when scalded by hot water,
not in restaurants where they clean and clean
and clean their hands raw.

Women don’t riot, not sober and earnest,
or high and strung out, not of any color, 
any race, not the rich, poor,
or those in between. And mothers of all kinds 
especially don’t run rampant through the streets.

In college those who’ve thought it out 
join hands in crucial times, carry signs,
are dragged away in protest.
We pass out petitions, organize a civilized vigil,
return to work the next day.

We women are sterilized, have more children
than they can feed,
don’t speak the official language,
want things they see on TV,
would like to own a TV—
women who were molested as children
raped,
beaten,
harassed, which means
every last one sooner or later;
women who’ve defended themselves
and women who can’t or don’t know how
we don’t—won’t ever rise up in arms.

We don’t storm through cities,
take over the press, make a unified statement,
once and for all: A third-millennium call—
from this day on no more, not me, not my daughter,
not her daughter either.

Women don’t form a battalion, march arm in arm
across continents bound
by the same tongue, same food or lack thereof,
same God, same abandonment,
same broken heart,
raising children on our own, have
so much endless misery in common
that must stop
not for one woman or every woman,
but for the sake of us all.

Quietly, instead, one and each takes the offense, 
rejection, bureaucratic dismissal, disease
that should not have been, insult,
shove, blow to the head,
a knife at her throat.
She won’t fight, she won’t even scream—
taught as she’s been
to be brought down as if by surprise.
She’ll die like an ant beneath a passing heel.
Today it was her. Next time who.

(via sorayachemaly)

Source: lazhuntiez

malpuesto:

A mi me gusta andar con perros sueltos!

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Source: lalala-comecaca-lalala

6large,

I should be (w)Riting…just wanted to share a screen shot of an illustration of a #ThreeSistersMethodology that I have begun to articulate 🌽#RelationalAccountability #Conocimiento #DecolonizingAnthropology #BorderFeministThought #MitakuyeOyasin

6borderfeministthought, conocimiento, mitakuyeoyasin, relationalaccountability, threesistersmethodology, decolonizinganthropology,

#Copal, an elemental cosmic equation that no damn Western Scientific theory can ever explain…Count down to qualifying exam only days away and in the midst of this organized chaos, Copal is the one theory I know best 🌀 #DecolonizingAnthropology #AllMyRelations

6allmyrelations, copal, decolonizinganthropology,

latinarebels:

zapatista 

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Source: uawmf

"…womb writing, which neither separates the body from the mind nor sets the latter against the heart…but allows each part of the body to become infused with consciousness"
Trinh T. Minh-Ha in Write Your Body and The Body in Theory
altagracialvarado:

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doctoral qualifying exam grind 🎓#DecolonizingAnthropology #CommunityAccountability #ResearchIsCeremony

6communityaccountability, decolonizinganthropology, researchisceremony, large,

"…it was Chicano and Chicana critics…who turned around the anthropological mirror, questioning the way they had been represented by outsiders and offering their own, more complex and more lacerating representations, which made salient the question of who had the authority to speak for whom."
Ruth Behar in The Vulnerable Observer
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